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June 6th, 2011
11:44 PM ET

Apple's iCloud: A bold step, but not far enough

When Apple boss Steve Jobs took the wraps off iCloud, the company's new cloud services, he gave us a glimpse at the future of computing.

(Confused by cloud computing? Watch News Stream's handy explainer right here!)

What is iCloud? It's a system for storing various bits of your data online, and pushing all that data to all your devices so that they are always in sync. For example, let's say you create a document on your Mac. Without needing to hit "Save", iCloud will automatically save a copy of it online, and push it out so you can edit that same document on your iPhone or iPad.

Apple calls iCloud a breakthrough. Jobs says it's the culmination of a decade-long effort to kill the desktop file system.

It's certainly a bold step forward. But is it bold enough? FULL POST

June 5th, 2011
08:07 PM ET

Roger Federer and the quest to be the best

In sport, there is always a burning desire to know: Who’s the greatest of all time? The answer, unfortunately, is never that easy.

It is almost impossible to compare teams and players from one era to another. Still, we try: Could World Cup winners Spain beat Pelé’s Brazil? Is Tiger Woods better than Jack Nicklaus? Never mind that sports evolve considerably down the years; rules change, equipment changes, and we change. Humans are in general bigger, faster and stronger than they used to be.

Even when eras do overlap and we get the match-up we want, time and age do not always cooperate. Witness the long-awaited fight between Lennox Lewis and Mike Tyson. Lewis was at the peak of his powers; Tyson was far from the fighter known in his prime as “The Baddest Man on the Planet.” Lewis knocked him out but could he knock out a young Tyson?

And then there's the case of Roger Federer. FULL POST

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Filed under: General • Personal musings • Sport
June 3rd, 2011
02:10 PM ET

Remembering Tiananmen, 22 years later

In the spring of 1989, the elements of a perfect storm were coming together in Beijing. From the death of Hu Yaobang to the "Tank Man," this is my video essay on the Tiananmen Square protests and the June 4th crackdown.

June 1st, 2011
04:30 AM ET

Bully-boy tactics making Blatter, FIFA 'family' untouchable?

Sepp Blatter prays his stranglehold can be sustained.

Take yourself back to the school playground. You may have been in with the in crowd. You may have been out on a limb. You may have been a bully. You may have been bullied. But it’s likely you recall the experience.

In or out, bully or bullied, many of us secretly loathed the clique creators while outwardly expending far too much time and energy trying to ingratiate ourselves with their inner circle. Because within that inner circle there was security and there was power.

Take yourself back to those occasions when teams were being picked in gym class. You may have been first choice. You may have been last.  I was personally in the latter category and I've never felt so isolated. I was not a sporty kid, and this, in Scottish terms, means I was not a football-playing kid. The epithet "beautiful" attached to the game never really held water with me back then. And, having since met Peter Beardsley, it doesn't hold water with me now.

I digress. My point is that, while the game ain’t exactly pretty at times, what’s happening in its corridors of power is positively grisly. Football itself may not overly excite me but FIFA fills me with morbid fascination.  Why? Because the sport’s governing body takes playground nightmares and writes them large.

FULL POST

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Filed under: General • Personal musings • Sport
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