.
November 25th, 2010
12:05 PM ET

Will it deter or provoke North Korea?

 

The USS George Washington is America’s massive nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. And it’s on its way to the Yellow Sea, not far from the site of Tuesday’s deadly clash between North and South Korea.

The carrier is heading toward the south of Yeonpyeong Island for long-planned U.S.-South Korea joint exercises that are set to start in the coming days.

The North Koreans have already denounced the upcoming drill, saying that the North will launch an additional attack on South Korea if it continues “reckless military provocation.”  North Korea indirectly referred to the planned U.S.-South Korea military drill as an example of provocation.

Admiral Mike Mullen, Chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, told CNN that the drills are “meant to send a very strong signal of deterrence and also work with our very close allies in South Korea.”

“We’re very focused on restraint – not letting this thing get out of control,” Mullen said.

But the Chinese don’t see it that way. 

The North Korean ally expressed “concern” over the exercises.  The Chinese Foreign Ministry announced, "We oppose any act that undermines peace and stability on the peninsula.”

So will the military exercises deter or provoke?  The world awaits Pyongyang’s response… as the USS George Washington makes its way to South Korea.


soundoff (3 Responses)
  1. geonerstiem

    thanks

    June 29, 2011 at 9:56 am | Reply
    • Yizhou

      I feel that, instead of sniedng physical radios which can undoubtedly be identified by North Korean officials, send information on how to fix their already-approved radios. I'm not knowledgable about the availability of soldering irons or electronic components, but I'm sure that if people outside the DPRK were able to figure out just what modifications were made to N.K.'s radios, it shouldn't be too hard to reverse or re-mod.If they've been sniedng baloons with radios within, they should instead send schematics and instructions on how to mod their radios to receive outside transmissions. This way the knowledge of happenings in the outside world doesn't disappear with a physical object.

      May 20, 2012 at 11:51 am | Reply
  2. Jain

    I feel that, instead of seinndg physical radios which can undoubtedly be identified by North Korean officials, send information on how to fix their already-approved radios. I'm not knowledgable about the availability of soldering irons or electronic components, but I'm sure that if people outside the DPRK were able to figure out just what modifications were made to N.K.'s radios, it shouldn't be too hard to reverse or re-mod.If they've been seinndg baloons with radios within, they should instead send schematics and instructions on how to mod their radios to receive outside transmissions. This way the knowledge of happenings in the outside world doesn't disappear with a physical object.

    September 7, 2012 at 10:12 pm | Reply

Leave a Reply to Jain


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.