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June 10th, 2014
02:46 PM ET

One year of Edward Snowden's revelations

"If history tells us anything it's that whistle-blowers are usually treated kindly, and claims of national security much less so."

Here's my interview with Edward Snowden's legal adviser, Ben Wizner, one year after Snowden revealed himself as the NSA leaker.

June 6th, 2014
12:07 PM ET

Bullets in Beijing: Tiananmen leader Shen Tong looks back

Shen Tong is a Chinese dissident who helped lead the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989.

Ahead of the 25th anniversary of the crackdown, I asked him about his experience during the demonstrations, and the chilling moment when he realized troops were not shooting rubber bullets.

We also talked about a lack of awareness in China about what happened back then.

"It seems like there is a collective amnesia not only due to the lack of information but also due to at least this tacit agreement between the post-'89 police state and the urban population," he tells me via satellite from New York.

"'Let’s forget about the past and why rock the boat' because there are several groups of elite populations, not just in China, that are making so much money so quickly."

But Shen is certain that the collective amnesia concerning Tiananmen will inevitably lift.

"There are plenty of indications that collective memory, so important to the national psyche, cannot be forgotten," says Shen.

"So even though a lot young people don’t know the details... those memories can come back very quickly as we’ve seen time and again in history."

June 5th, 2014
02:34 PM ET

Liu Xiaobo's "June Fourth Elegies"

Before his arrest in 2009, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo would write a poem every year to commemorate the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown.

The poems have been translated into English by Jeffrey Yang and published in the compilation, "June Fourth Elegies."

I talked to Yang about Liu Xiaobo's poetry, and the power of poetry to remember an event that has been publicly erased in China.

June 5th, 2014
02:18 PM ET

Inside Hong Kong's June 4 Museum

In an unassuming office building in Hong Kong, is the world's first museum dedicated to the Tiananmen crackdown of 1989.

Let's go inside.

May 27th, 2014
07:13 AM ET

After "Every Day in Cambodia"

Many CNN viewers know him as Mira Sorvino's guide in "Every Day in Cambodia," the 2013 CNN Freedom Project documentary that fixed a spotlight on child sex trafficking in the country.

American activist Don Brewster has dedicated his life to saving Cambodia's children. As the founder of Agape International Mission, he has helped rescue hundreds of girls from sexual slavery.

In Hong Kong, I talked to Brewster about how he tracks down Cambodia's enslaved girls, helps to rebuild their lives, and equips local communities to join the fight against the despicable trade.

Brewster also tells me about the impact of the Freedom Project documentary, and how it has led to justice for some of the girls in Cambodia.

May 16th, 2014
02:11 PM ET

A strong message against illegal ivory

This week, the Hong Kong government started to destroy almost 30 tons of confiscated ivory.

It is destroying the massive stockpile by burning it. Officials plan to incinerate about three tons of illegal ivory a month. The process is expected to take at least a year.

Ivory has long been valued in China for making prized seals and carvings - turning China into a global hub for the illegal ivory trade.

So can this high-profile government program send a strong enough message to end the public's appetite for elephant tusks?

I talked to wildlife activist Sharon Kwok for her reaction to the campaign.

May 15th, 2014
05:34 PM ET

Breaking down #FCCNetNeutrality

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has voted to move forward with a proposal that could create Internet "fast lanes." Now the FCC will collect public comments on the new rules for net neutrality.

There have long been concerns that the rules would undermine an open Internet where all content is treated equally, and instead allow companies to pay for priority access.

A Twitter chat earlier this week reveals that the FCC is concerned about protecting an open Internet and is considering all options.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler tweeted, "Title II is a viable option we’re considering. We are listening and welcome continued discussion. #FCCNetNeutrality"

That's a reference to Title II of the Communications Act. Currently, broadband Internet is not bound by those common-carrier regulations.

Our regular tech contributor Nick Thompson, editor of the NewYorker.com, points out that there are two ways to for the FCC to safeguard net neutrality: pass new rules that could get bogged down in court, or reclassify Internet providers as public utilities under Title II.

Click on to hear Nick break down the issues at stake and the options for the FCC.

May 14th, 2014
06:54 AM ET

What is needed to stop torture?

It has been 30 years since the United Nations adopted the Convention Against Torture, which commits all governments to combating the abuse.

And yet, torture remains widespread across Asia.

Amnesty International reports there are at least 23 Asia-Pacific countries still carrying out acts of torture. It adds that the true number is likely to be higher.

The human rights group says China and North Korea are among the worst offenders.

Torture is also used to force confessions or silence activists in other countries in the region including India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.

What is needed to finally stop torture?

I posed that question to Roseann Rife, East Asia Research Director of Amnesty International. Click on to hear her thoughts on what can finally end the brutal practice.

May 8th, 2014
01:59 PM ET

Weighing in on the Alibaba IPO

Alibaba has filed its IPO in New York to raise $1 billion, but former Alibaba CEO David Wei is confident it will raise even more than Facebook's $16 billion bonanza.

Though many anticipate a blockbuster IPO, industry watchers also expect significant challenges ahead for the Chinese e-commerce giant.

How will Alibaba address concerns about the amount of counterfeit goods sold by its users - concerns that prompted Wei to resign after a fraud inquiry in 2011?

And how will Alibaba manage the shift to mobile, especially given the threat from Tencent's WeChat - the Chinese mobile app already on its way to becoming a global brand?

Click on for my conversation with China tech investor and former Alibaba CEO, David Wei.

(His catchphrase to describe founder Jack Ma may raise an eyebrow!)

March 11th, 2014
07:22 PM ET

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Passport Mystery Solved

Authorities have identified the two passengers who used stolen passports to travel on the missing Malaysia Airlines plane.

Both are Iranian men. Neither is believed to have any terror link, easing initial fears that foul play could be behind the plane's disappearance.

Earlier in the day, Malaysian officials identified the first passenger as 19-year-old Pouria Nour Mohammad Mehrdad, who they believe was trying to emigrate to Germany.

But why were stolen passports used on the missing airliner? And how deep is the airport security flaw it exposes?

Earlier, I talked to Phil Robertson, Deputy Director Asia Division of Human Rights Watch. He contextualizes why Mehrdad would use a stolen passport to reach Germany.

Robertson says that after the Green Revolution in Iran, “There were many Iranians who fled to Malaysia. Malaysia is a country where you can get visa-free entry for many Middle East passports. And so a significant number of asylum seekers from Iran did end up in Malaysia."

As for what the incident says about airport security and screening in Malaysia, Robertson says, "It's very interesting. I was a bit surprised to see people with stolen passports elude security at the Malaysia airport. That's one of the more effective and efficient airports in Southeast Asia."

Click on to hear more from Robertson including his thoughts on whether the two men were part of a human smuggling operation, and the thriving trade for stolen passports in Southeast Asia.

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