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March 12th, 2014
12:00 PM ET

World Wide Web turns 25

It started as a project by a British computer scientist to make it easier for universities to share and navigate large amounts of information.

Twenty-five years on, the World Wide Web stands as perhaps our greatest ever creation: A way to access the collective knowledge of humanity.

You can watch our tribute to Sir Tim Berners-Lee's creation above and check out a recreation of the first ever webpage right here.

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Filed under: General • Technology
March 11th, 2014
07:22 PM ET

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Passport Mystery Solved

Authorities have identified the two passengers who used stolen passports to travel on the missing Malaysia Airlines plane.

Both are Iranian men. Neither is believed to have any terror link, easing initial fears that foul play could be behind the plane's disappearance.

Earlier in the day, Malaysian officials identified the first passenger as 19-year-old Pouria Nour Mohammad Mehrdad, who they believe was trying to emigrate to Germany.

But why were stolen passports used on the missing airliner? And how deep is the airport security flaw it exposes?

Earlier, I talked to Phil Robertson, Deputy Director Asia Division of Human Rights Watch. He contextualizes why Mehrdad would use a stolen passport to reach Germany.

Robertson says that after the Green Revolution in Iran, “There were many Iranians who fled to Malaysia. Malaysia is a country where you can get visa-free entry for many Middle East passports. And so a significant number of asylum seekers from Iran did end up in Malaysia."

As for what the incident says about airport security and screening in Malaysia, Robertson says, "It's very interesting. I was a bit surprised to see people with stolen passports elude security at the Malaysia airport. That's one of the more effective and efficient airports in Southeast Asia."

Click on to hear more from Robertson including his thoughts on whether the two men were part of a human smuggling operation, and the thriving trade for stolen passports in Southeast Asia.

March 7th, 2014
02:22 PM ET

Who is the brains behind Bitcoin?

The original paper that proposed Bitcoin is credited to a "Satoshi Nakamoto."

It was widely assumed to be a pseudonym for the team of coders behind the virtual currency.

But then, came this - a blockbuster Newsweek cover story, written by Leah McGrath Goodman, that names Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto as "the mystery man behind the crypto-currency."

The report has generated a lot of controversy, especially among members of the Bitcoin community who say the evidence is insufficient and circumstantial.

And since the revelation, Mr. Nakamoto himself has denied any link to the virtual currency.

So is he truly the brains behind Bitcoin?

That was the first question I posed to Newsweek's Leah McGrath Goodman…